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Whispers

The book Whispers was made into the movie Whispers.

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Book details for Whispers

Whispers was written by Dean R. Koontz. The book was published in 1980 by G.P. Putnam's Sons. More information on the book is available on Amazon.com.

Dean R. Koontz also wrote Phantoms (1983), The Servants of Twilight (1984), Watchers (1987) and Hideaway (1992).

Read More About This Book

The classic of suspense from Dean KoontzHe's back--the terror that stalked Hilary Thomas as a child is back in her life, in her house, at her bedroom door. She killed him once. But he keeps coming back. Again. And again..."An incredible, terrifying ta... Read More
The classic of suspense from Dean Koontz

He's back--the terror that stalked Hilary Thomas as a child is back in her life, in her house, at her bedroom door. She killed him once. But he keeps coming back. Again. And again...

"An incredible, terrifying tale."--Publishers Weekly

Movie details for Whispers

The movie was released in 1989 and directed by Ingmar Bergman. Whispers was produced by Criterion. More information on the movie is available on Amazon.com and also IMDb.

Actors on this movie include Harriet Andersson, Kari Sylwan, Ingrid Thulin, Liv Ullmann, Anders Ek, Inga Gill, Erland Josephson, Henning Moritzen, Georg Årlin, Malin Gjörup, Rosanna Mariano, Monika Priede, Börje Lundh, Karin Johansson, Greta Johansson, Ingrid von Rosen, Lena Bergman, Lars-Owe Carlberg, Ann-Christin Lobråten and Linn Ullmann.

 

Read More About This Movie

Ingmar Bergman's great 1972 film is about the elemental things: death and dying, sex, injury, repression, and the body as a fount of sustenance. No wonder Bergman chooses to focus on female characters, in this case three sisters--one of whom is dying of t... Read More
Ingmar Bergman's great 1972 film is about the elemental things: death and dying, sex, injury, repression, and the body as a fount of sustenance. No wonder Bergman chooses to focus on female characters, in this case three sisters--one of whom is dying of tuberculosis--and a maid who is the only one capable of caring for the ill woman. The film is noteworthy for many reasons, not least of all an interesting camera style that marries beautiful imagery with an anxious frame. That tension perfectly suits the overlapping psychodramas of the piece, but this is a movie that ultimately pushes beyond the particulars of these characters' virtues or neuroses to a greater mystery, one that somehow sustains our existence while slowly taking it away. A landmark film. --Tom Keogh