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O Que é Isso, Companheiro?

The book O Que é Isso, Companheiro? was made into the movie Four Days in September.

Which one did you like better, the book or the movie?  Right now there is 1 vote for the book, and 4 votes for the movie.

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Book details for O Que é Isso, Companheiro?

O Que é Isso, Companheiro? was written by Fernando Gabeira. The book was published in 1979 by Companhia das Letras. More information on the book is available on Amazon.com.

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Movie details for Four Days in September

The movie was released in 1997 and directed by Bruno Barreto, who also directed A Show of Force (1990) and Carried Away (1996). Four Days in September was produced by Miramax. More information on the movie is available on Amazon.com.

Actors on this movie include Alan Arkin, Fernanda Torres, Pedro Cardoso, Luiz Fernando Guimarães, Cláudia Abreu, Nelson Dantas, Matheus Nachtergaele, Marco Ricca, Maurício Gonçalves, Caio Junqueira, Selton Mello, Eduardo Moscovis, Caroline Kava, Fisher Stevens, Fernanda Montenegro, Milton Gonçalves, Othon Bastos, Lulu Santos, Alessandra Negrini and Jorge Cherques.

 

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In 1969, the democratically elected government of Brazil was toppled and a military dictatorship took its place. The junta ruled through terror and intimidation, torturing political enemies, controlling the press, and severely curtailing freedoms. A group... Read More
In 1969, the democratically elected government of Brazil was toppled and a military dictatorship took its place. The junta ruled through terror and intimidation, torturing political enemies, controlling the press, and severely curtailing freedoms. A group of Che Guevara-worshipping Marxist radicals (the MR-8) plotted to kidnap an American diplomat (Alan Arkin) to force the government to meet their demands. The college radicals hooked up with two senior revolutionaries, an avuncular veteran of the Spanish Civil War and a cold, ruthlessly intense younger man who becomes their commandant. What could easily have become an overwrought drama is instead played out in understatement. The middle-class radicals falter more than once when it looks like they will indeed have to execute their captive; their counterparts in the government's secret police grapple with their consciences when it comes to torture and terror. Arkin is excellent as Charles Elbrick, the diplomat; his conversations with his abductors bring out his humanity as the deadline draws near. Overall, the film--which receieved a Best Foreign-Language Oscar nomination--has a sense of tension and claustrophobia that is as oppressive as the clammy Rio de Janeiro humidity. This is a thoughtful political drama with emotional depth, well-drawn characters, and excellent direction. (Incidentally, the radicals' commitment paid off in 1979, when Brazil's democracy was restored and all political prisoners were given amnesty.) Stuart Copeland provides the excellent score, along with '60s-period bossa nova music. --Jerry Renshaw