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Les Miserables

The book Les Miserables was made into the movie Les Miserables.

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Book details for Les Miserables

Les Miserables was written by Victor Hugo. The book was published in 1982 by Fawcett. More information on the book is available on Amazon.com.

Victor Hugo also wrote Notre-Dame de Paris (1844).

 

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Sensational, dramatic, packed with rich excitement and filled with the sweep and violence of human passions, LES MISERABLES is not only superb adventure but a powerful social document. The story of how the convict Jean-Valjean struggled to escape his past... Read More
Sensational, dramatic, packed with rich excitement and filled with the sweep and violence of human passions, LES MISERABLES is not only superb adventure but a powerful social document. The story of how the convict Jean-Valjean struggled to escape his past and reaffirm his humanity, in a world brutalized by poverty and ignorance, became the gospel of the poor and the oppressed.

Movie details for Les Miserables

The movie was released in 1998 and directed by Bille August, who also directed The House of the Spirits (1993) and Smilla's Sense of Snow (1997). Les Miserables was produced by Sony Pictures. More information on the movie is available on Amazon.com.

Actors on this movie include Liam Neeson, Geoffrey Rush, Uma Thurman, Claire Danes, Hans Matheson, Reine Brynolfsson, Peter Vaughan, Julian Rhind-Tutt, Alex Norton, Zdenek Vencl, Janet Henfrey, John McGlynn, Zdenék Hess, Ben Crompton, Jan Kuzelka, Tony Vogel, Terry Taplin, Pavel Voukan, Jirí Patocka and Philip McGough.

 

Read More About This Movie

Frenchman Jean Valjean (Liam Neeson), imprisoned for stealing bread, is paroled after nearly two decades of hard labor. A gift of silver candlesticks from a kindly priest helps him begin anew. Forging a decent and profitable existence, he finds success as... Read More
Frenchman Jean Valjean (Liam Neeson), imprisoned for stealing bread, is paroled after nearly two decades of hard labor. A gift of silver candlesticks from a kindly priest helps him begin anew. Forging a decent and profitable existence, he finds success as a businessman and as the mayor of a small town. He even takes in a pregnant young woman (Uma Thurman) and raises her daughter as his own. When a former prison guard (Geoffrey Rush) recognizes Valjean, his past catches up to him. Director Bille August culls mesmerizing performances from his cast, but loses us with an ending that panders to teen audiences. The focus shifts dramatically, and uncomfortably, from the haunted Neeson and his hawk-like pursuer, to his daughter (Claire Danes) and her romance with a handsome revolutionary. After this narrative shift, the script leaves behind the Victor Hugo classic's themes of revenge and redemption to focus improbably on teen angst--hardly what Hugo had on his mind. --Rochelle O'Gorman