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Virtual Sexual Reality

The book Virtual Sexual Reality was made into the movie Virtual Sexuality.

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Book details for Virtual Sexual Reality

Virtual Sexual Reality was written by ChloŽ Rayban. The book was published in 1994.

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Movie details for Virtual Sexuality

The movie was released in 1999 and directed by Nick Hurran. Virtual Sexuality was produced by Sony Pictures. More information on the movie is available on Amazon.com and also IMDb.

Actors on this movie include Laura Fraser (II), Rupert Penry-Jones, Luke de Lacey, Kieran O'Brien, Steve John Shepherd, Marcelle Duprey, Natasha Bell, Laura MacAulay, Roger Frost, Ruth Sheen, Laura Aikman, Ram John Holder, Amanda Holden, Alan Westaway, William Osborne (II), Philip Bird, Judith Scott (III), Stewart Harwood, Nicholas Pry and Alison Garland.

 

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Justine (the delightful Laura Fraser), the heroine of Virtual Sexuality, thinks her life is ruined because she's a 17-year-old virgin. Through her friend Chas (Luke DeLacey), she tries to maneuver a cute but boorish athlete into a date, but he stands her ... Read More
Justine (the delightful Laura Fraser), the heroine of Virtual Sexuality, thinks her life is ruined because she's a 17-year-old virgin. Through her friend Chas (Luke DeLacey), she tries to maneuver a cute but boorish athlete into a date, but he stands her up. Despondent, she and Chas go to a virtual reality exhibition, which features a virtual makeover machine--but instead of modeling a different version of herself, Justine creates a 3-D image of her perfect man. Due to a freak accident, Justine suddenly finds herself inside of that male body--she's become her own ideal mate (Rupert Penry-Jones)--and the life of a boy isn't the one she wants to live. This charming comedy is being marketed as if this plot twist didn't exist, which is peculiar because this is what makes the movie fun. There aren't any stunning revelations about gender roles as Chas teaches "Jake"--the name the male Justine gives herself--but there's a sweet playfulness to how Jake interacts with his body and the rest of the world. Fraser and Penry-Jones are perfectly matched; they do a superb job of seeming like the same personality in two different bodies. Its ads make Virtual Sexuality look like yet another movie about two girls fighting over a guy, but that doesn't describe this unexpected British comedy at all--its female perspective on sex takes it in an entirely different direction. Based on a novel by ChloŽ Rayban. --Bret Fetzer