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Theatre

The book Theatre was made into the movie Being Julia.

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Book details for Theatre

Theatre was written by W. Somerset Maugham. The book was published in 1937 by Pan Books.. More information on the book is available on Amazon.com.

W. Somerset Maugham also wrote The Painted Veil (1925), Up at the Villa (1941) and The Razor's Edge (1944).

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Movie details for Being Julia

The movie was released in 2004 and directed by István Szabó. Being Julia was produced by Sony Pictures. More information on the movie is available on Amazon.com and also IMDb.

Actors on this movie include Michael Gambon, Annette Bening, Leigh Lawson, Shaun Evans (II), Mari Kiss, Jeremy Irons, Ronald Markham, Terry Sach, Catherine Charlton, Juliet Stevenson, Miriam Margolyes, Max Irons, Andrew Paton Story Busher, George Lang (II), Michael Culkin, Marsha Fitzalan, Bruce Greenwood, Denzel Sinclaire, Julian Richings and Tom Sturridge.

 

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Annette Bening's outstanding performance is the best reason to see Being Julia, a highly melodramatic adaptation of the 1937 novel Theatre by W. Somerset Maugham. With a prestigious pedigree (director Istvan Szabo and screenwriter Ronald Harwood share imp... Read More
Annette Bening's outstanding performance is the best reason to see Being Julia, a highly melodramatic adaptation of the 1937 novel Theatre by W. Somerset Maugham. With a prestigious pedigree (director Istvan Szabo and screenwriter Ronald Harwood share impressive theatrical backgrounds) and a stellar cast including Jeremy Irons, Bruce Greenwood, and Juliet Stevenson, the film's backstage and onstage theatrics take place in pre-World War II London, when the venerable actress Julia (Bening) fends off middle-age by romancing a stage-struck young American (Shaun Evans) in a calculated attempt to retain some youthful vitality while airing her own dirty laundry onstage in a glorious act of divine diva behavior. Treating life and theater as one big play in which she's the perpetual star, Julia's nothing if not a master thespian, and Bening's got all the chops to keep her in the spotlight. If the film isn't quite worthy of Bening's excellence, at least it gives her performance the showcase it deserves. -- Jeff Shannon