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Undertow (story)

The book Undertow (story) was made into the movie Undertow.

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Book details for Undertow (story)

Undertow (story) was written by Lingard Jervey. .

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Movie details for Undertow

The movie was released in 2004 and directed by David Gordon Green. Undertow was produced by MGM (Video & DVD). More information on the movie is available on Amazon.com.

Actors on this movie include Jamie Bell, Kristen Stewart, Devon Alan, Robert Longstreet, Terry Loughlin, Dermot Mulroney, Josh Lucas, Eddie Rouse, Patrice Johnson, Charles 'Jester' Poston, Mark Darby Robinson, Pat Healy, Leigh Hill, Alfred M. Jackson, William D. Turner, Michael Bacall, Shiri Appleby, Carla Bessey, Damian Jewan Lee and Bill McKinney.

 

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The dazed, dreamlike world of director David Gordon Green remains intact, although Undertow has more story than his previous gems (All the Real Girls, George Washington). In the hot, green Georgia countryside, a man (Dermot Mulroney) lives with his two so... Read More
The dazed, dreamlike world of director David Gordon Green remains intact, although Undertow has more story than his previous gems (All the Real Girls, George Washington). In the hot, green Georgia countryside, a man (Dermot Mulroney) lives with his two sons on a farm; their existence is shattered by the arrival of the man's Faulknerian brother (Josh Lucas), a dangerous sort with an ulterior motive. The movie that follows is like The Night of the Hunter filtered through a Days of Heaven lens--there's even a Heaven-like narration provided by Jamie Bell. That's what you get for having Terrence Malick produce your movie. The plot doesn't always sit comfortably with Green's uncanny style--sometimes it feels like an intrusion on a private world of childhood--and Josh Lucas is "actory" in a way that most Green actors are not. Green is at his best when noticing some stray detail (the younger brother likes to arrange his books according to smell), not when connecting the dots of story. Still, the images will stick in your mind, Tim Orr's cinematography is superb, and Philip Glass provides a suitably mysterioso score. --Robert Horton